“A Night Less Ordinary” – thoughts about social media, evalution and campaiging

The ACE scheme, Night Less Ordinary (ANLO), which has given away almost five hundred thousand theatre tickets to under 26-year-olds, is winding down. At RIBA this week, many of those who took part, were brought together by ACE and external consultant Pam Jarvis from sam who have been evaluating the campaign.

The aim of the event was to look at ‘What did we learn?’ I was there as part of a session called ‘Re-imagining A Night Less Ordinary’ and was asked to talk about the opportunities arising from social media to attract audiences.

The event was dominated by theatres and organisations working with young people and theatre. Not my usual crowd but there are, perhaps unsurprisingly, a lot of cross overs with the GLAM sectors work – both in terms of using social media but also in developing audiences for young people.

I shared some learning from two projects Culture24 is leading on, as well as some personal thoughts about the initiative. Here are some of my speaker notes:

1. Action Research ‘How to evaluate online success’
Through this project we have been looking at differences between popularity and engagement within social media channels and also the relationship between:
– the organisations’ investment in social media and their return (either as increased popularity of demonstrable engagement)
– their level of investment and their popularity
– their levels of investment and their popularity
– those who ‘like’ their brand and those who engage with a subject

The project has found some perhaps unexpected findings that suggest that engagement is driven by brand rather than content. In other words, people engage with content about subjects they care about more than content about organisations – even if they ‘like’ these places.

There is clear evidence that, as with all traditional marketing, the more money and resources you throw at something, the more popular you can make it. But engagement – the more elusive cultural sector goal – is not just about scale of your resources but the nature of your message.

The key to all this is segmentation of your audience – targeting what you are offering to specific groups of people. The more precise you can be the better.

The project is working on a framework for measuring social media success that:
– sets objectives
– defines what success is
– looks at action planning
– defines what you need to count
– feedback loop

2. Museums at Night
Coordinated by Culture24, this is a low budget, high content value campaign of late night openings that take place each year in May.

Our approach to the campaign is to push the content of the individual events rather than the brand. We use our central digital infrastructure to collect all the information about individual events into one database. We then interrogate and cut this data to fit different Press and PR needs.

Social Media activities have focused on Twitter (sharing event details) and a ‘behind the scenes’ blog that is written for the sector (those venues putting on events) and feeds new ideas for cross sector collaboration, both of which have been successful in their different goals.

This year we have developed a strategy for Facebook that is all about pushing event listings and ticket offers into existing networks that already have a subject- related interest.

All of these approaches are editorially driven, using examples of stories, experiences and events to engage people and hopefully inspire them to share with their own networks.

We have tried to learn from how other sectors successful use Facebook and other social media networks, such as the Digital Street Teams that are often created from fan bases for bands.
An interesting point here is that this kind of approach crosses over between online and offline and there are interesting parallels with how you could take this approach in Museums or Galleries.

3. Thoughts
Whilst the successful buzz generated online around ANLO is great, it is possibly missing the point about what social media can really do. This is more about creating ‘conversations’. The question is how to create and nurture spaces for conversations to take place – especially when so often they are niche, unequal and opinionated?

There is a scale of participation which begins with those channels that are simply promotion and ends with channels that illicit curation, participation and ongoing relationships.

‘Liking’ is an easy commodity but how meaningful is it?

It does not require any dialogue, participation or exchange – ie: real engagement.
If you go further than just broadcasting your messages, you have to be ready to:
– have something to say
– be genuinely willing to listen/act
– have your whole organisation on board (vertically)
– link your backstage, front of house, management, education, marketing – all of it.
– have the capacity to keep the conversations going
– be specific about what your offer to different groups (under 26 is not one audience)

Finally, there are a lot of clichés about the scale of change around digital opportunities but the real revolution is social not technical. The best way to think about it all is not as ‘online’ or ‘offline’ but as a blended experience with a specific strategic aim.

The big opportunities lie at a deeper level around how your audiences can curate a program or lead your services. Projects like the Taking Part festival and A Younger Audience are testimony of this.

The video of me and the other speakers (Jake Orr, James Mackenzie-Blackman and Susan Whiddington) is available here.

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